Slide 1

Stephen Mack & Hannah Saunders Covey family

Slide 2

Irene, Stephen, Grandy, Helen Jean, John, Marilyn

Slide 3

Grandy, Marilyn, Helen Jean, Irene

Slide 4

Papa & Grandy

Slide 5

Stephen Mack Covey, 4th from the right

Slide 6

John, Helen Jean, Irene, Stephen

Slide 6

Stephen L with his boys

Slide 6

Family photo at Grandy & Papa's house

Slide 6

Snake River cabin

Slide 6

Stephen Longstroth Richards and Grandy in the dining room at the canyon cabin

Slide 6

Christmas, approximately 1912

Slide 6

Believed to be Mark & Susannah Ogden Bigler

Slide 6

George Albert & Bathsheba Bigler Smith

Slide 6

L to R, Stephen Glenn Covey, Irene Louise Richards Covey, Stephen Mack Covey

Slide 6

Enoch & Janett Carruth Young Covey

Slide 6

Stephen L & Irene Smith Merrill Richards

Slide 6

Demas Ashdown & Hannah Barwell Saunders

Slide 6

Stephen Glenn Covey (2nd from right, back row) with siblings

Slide 6

Covey Family Photo at Grandy's and Papa's

Slide 6

L to R, John, Marilyn, Helen Jean, Irene, Stephen

Slide 6

Stephen Mack & Hannah Ashdown Covey

Example Frame

Ann's Birthday Party

Look for Ann, John, Carol, Jeff, HJ, and Grandy!

Hello, Dearies!

WHAT'S NEW???  
 I just found this photo of Bathsheba Bigler Smith (2nd from right, front row), Bathsheba Kate Smith Merrill (4th from right, front row), and Grandma Richards (Irene Smith Merrill Richards), (3rd from left, back row)!  Fun, huh?
























Irene Louise Richards (Grandy)

This is the new Covey-Richards Family History Website...

THE DEARIES 

At Grandy's Christmas Party (2011), we discussed having a website we could use to share photographs and life stories of our ancestors, our own memories, and family history information with each other.  

Well, here it is.  Obviously, it's a work in progress.  

The main reason I did this is for my children and grandchildren (and your children and grandchildren).  So, here you go, guys!  There are some amazing stories of courage, endurance, and faith in the lives of those who paved the way for all of us...OUR OWN KIN.

Stephen Glenn Covey (Papa)
Feel free to add comments.  If you'd like to add information, photos, memories, or pedigrees, email them to me, and I'll upload them (louise@hciutah.com).  I'm doing it this way so that creepy people don't hack our website ;o-)

Love ya...Louise Williams Nelson (Weez)

P.S.  I took most of the dates from newfamilysearch.org, but you should know that there are many duplicate dates for almost all of our ancestors.  I used the ones that looked most official to me, from what appeared to be the best sources.

ENJOY! 

Why do we call this "The Dearies?"  Grandy called us all "Dearies," and we loved it!



“To forget one's ancestors 
is to be a brook without a source, 
a tree without root”
 ~Chinese Proverb



Hannah Barwell

FAST FACTS

NOTES

BIRTH...Nov. 7, 1839, Corby North Hampshire, England

PARENTS...John Barwell & Ann White

BAPTISM...Feb 1859 in the ocean

MARRIAGE...Demas Ashdown Saunders, March 20, 1860 at Brighton, Sussex, England

CHILDREN

  1. Ann Barwell
  2. John William
  3. Alice
  4. George Thomas
  5. Hannah
  6. Elizabeth Ruth
  7. Ephraim Louis
  8. David Henry
  9. Alfred Joseph
  10. Charles Owen


DEATH...October 1924

DIRECT LINE

Marilyn Louise Williams
Marilyn Richards Covey
Papa (Stephen Glenn Covey)
Hannah Ashdown Saunders
Hannah Barwell
_______________________________________ 

The Hannah Barwell Saunders Story 

I desire to leave a record of those events and scenes through which I have passed that my children, down to my lasted posterity, may understand what ancestors were willing to suffer, and did suffer patiently for the gospel’s sake. And I wish then to know too, that what I now write is the history of hundreds of others men, women, and children, who passed through like scene at the same time we did. 


I also desire them to know that it was in obedience o the commandments of the true and living God< and with the assurance of an eternal reward—an exaltation to eternal life in his kingdom--that we suffered these things. I hope too, that I will to suffer and sacrifice all things they may be required to pass through the sake of the kingdom of god.
 

I was born in Corby North Hampshire, England November 7th 1839. My father’s name was John Barwell. He was born in Dennethope, North Hampshire, December 7th 1815 and was a shoe maker by trade. My mother’s name was Ann White. She was born in Corby North Hampshire, England August 5th 1810 and was the daughter of Thomas White and Ann Streader. Weather my parent ever joined the church.
 

I was the oldest of seven children, and helped my mother care for my younger brothers and sisters. I had very little education. Sometimes I went out to service. 

In 1858 having an Aunt and sister in Brighton, I went there and took a position as a maid in a young gentleman’s college. Here I met my future husband, Demas Ashdown Saunders. Learning that he was a Morman. I went to their meetings, curious to find out what they were like. The president of the branch at that time was a bother David Pudney. The visits continued, and in February1 859 I was baptized in the ocean by Demas Saunders at the age of nineteen. 

On March 20th1860, I married Demas Saunders, at Brighton, Sussex England. My husband was born at Walden, Sussex, England, April 24th 1834 and died in Salt Lake city Utah 1898.
 

On March 30th 1860, our ocean and overland journey to Utah began. We sailed from Liver Pool on board the sailing ship, Underwriter. There were seven hundred should on board, and a cooked meal could only be obtained once in three days as the galley was so small. We had a good but rough passage and several deaths occurred on board. We landed in Castel guard, New York in May 1, 1860.
 

We went by board and rail to Saint Joseph and from there. We went by boat up the Missouri River to Florence Nebraska. 

We stayed in Florence until June 6th.when we began our journey with handcarts over the plains to Utah. There were about two hundred souls in our company, with fifty handcarts and four wagons with ox teams to carry stores, tents, etc. Captain Daniel Robinson was in command. (Ninth Handcart Company)
 

For two and one half months we toiled on. Dragging the hand carts load with provisions, clothing and supplies, thru sand and fording many streams. I was a long, dreary Journey and we traveled many miles each day till camp was reached, tired and weary we cooked supper and retired to rest, to gain strength to pursue our course the next day.
 

The weather was warm and we suffered from heat, thirst and hunger. The provisions ran low until each person was drawing only one once of flour per day. This was mixed with water and a little salt and soda and baked in a skillet. Water was scares and it was often necessary to travel long distances to find sufficient water to drink. We crossed many streams and as there were no bridges, we had to ford them. In some cases the men carried the women on their backs. At other times they waded as the men did.
 

When we reached Laramie, my sister-in-law, Ann Hook lent money to the captain to buy flour and men were sent to Laramie to procure it. The only game seen was one rabbit. One of the men claimed he shot it and another claimed his dog caught it, and in the ensuing quarrel the rabbit was torn in two, each taking half.
 

One day as my mother-in-law, Alice Hook, was sitting in her cart, her son attempted to draw a shot gun from the cart, when the gun discharged, the shot going thru her arm. She was healed by the power of faith, through the administration of the brethren.
 

As the men and team grew tired and weaker, our load had to be lightened and clothing and other belongings were taken out and burned. Only one death occurred during the trip, that of a child which died suddenly. Judging from the experience of other companies we considered ourselves greatly blessed in this regard.
 

One day a band of Indians, accompanied by some drunken mountaineers, appeared hostile and preparations were made to defend ourselves, but the men in the company were able to quiet them and they passed on in peace.
 

We wended our way over big and little mountains in Emigration Canyon. When the “Hog Back” at the mouth of the Emigration was reached, we obtained our first view of the city. 

Worn with hunger, and tiered out from my long trip, I cried with disappointment. It was a contrast to the beautiful towns and cities in England. We reached the city on August 27, 1860 and camped on the eigh ward square, where the city and county building now stands. 

The winter was spent in Salt Lake City. 


The following summer (1861) we were called to settle San Pete, making with the tithing teams. We settled in Ephraim and Demas went to work for Bernard snow in the saw mill where he ran a circular saw, taking pay in food.
 

We stayed in Ephraim until 1863 when we were called to settle Sevier River in circle valley. The first summer the crops were frost bitten. We ran out of flour and had to eat flour make of frost bitten wheat. This wheat was first ground in a coffee mill but later a stone was fixed to grind the wheat. We had only such clothing as we had been able to bring with us and were often hungry.
 

After the first year, the Indians became hostile and Demas often had to stand guard. One day in the summer of 1864, I say the Indians beginning to gather up the cattle and I gave the alarm. They were driven away but four persons were killed, one of them a boy I saw shot. The Indians took some of the cattle. The trouble continued and the settlement was broken up. 

In June of 1865 we came as far north as Ephraim and stayed two or three months ad Demas was sick with mountain fever. 

In fall of 1865 we returned to Salt Lake City.
 

In Fall of 1867, We took up land on the east bench and mad our home there on what is now third south and thirteenth East. The first home was a “dugout.” Lumber at that time was worth $10.00 per hundred feet and nails were forty cents per pound. Sage brush was used for fuel. This property is still in possession of the Saunders family.
 

We were blessed with Ten Children, namely, Ann Barwell, John William, Alice, George Thomas, Hannah, Elizabeth Ruth, Ephraim Louis, David Henry, Alfred Joseph, and Charles Owen. Alice was born in circle valley and John was born in Ephraim. The others were all born in Salt Lake city.
 

I was acquainted with Brigham Young. At one time Brother John T Cain called me to care for their sick baby and Brigham Young took me to the Cain home in his carriage.
 

I have been a teacher in the Relief society for fifty five years and I am still working in that capacity (19th). I have had many testimonies of the truth of the work and hope to be faithful to the course of truth. Much of my time is now spent working for the died in the temple. 

Hannah Barwell Saunders died October 1924 




Stephen Richards Covey 1932 - 2012


My heart goes out to all of Stephens children and dear aunt Sandra. Ryan and I had the privilege of going to the hosptial in Idaho Falls late Sunday night and seeing Stephen one last time. He was surrounded by his children and their spouses and Sandra's siblings. What a powerful spirit that filled that hosptial room! As I looked into the faces of those great people I truly felt honored to be apart of the Covey family. The children made Ryan and I feel so welcomed as we poked our heads into the room and they even gave Ryan a few compliments on being a great OBGYN to some of their family members. They were generous and thoughtful of others just as uncle Steve would want them to be at a very difficult moment. We were touched. The spirit of God filled that room along with a deep love.
Thank you Stephen's children for the people you are and the legacy you carry on.
We love you!
Our thoughts and prayers are with you during this difficult time.

-Irene and Ryan Jones
 _________________ 

I got the news that my great uncle Stephen Covey passed away this morning. What an amazing man, who impacted so many people. I'm reminded of the quote from Braveheart: "Every man dies. Not every man really lives."

-Michael Covey Nelson 
_________________
          I've been thinking of all the experiences I had with Stephen, and one stood out.
       I once sat next to Stephen at a dinner.  He was speaking with someone who was obviously upset at him.  He was even, from my perspective, being belittled by this person.
       I watched Stephen as he listened to the uncomfortable words.  I could see the wheels turning in his head.  I thought of that short time between stimulus and response he always talked about--that important moment where you have a choice.  "I'm seeing this as it's happening," I thought.
       I remember thinking that if it were me, I would want to really let this person have it.  The words weren't fair or kind or appropriate.  But, Stephen just sat there, choosing his response.  I'll never forget it.
       And, his response was...NOTHING.  He just smiled and changed the subject.  He didn't belittle the person across from him.  He didn't get angry.  He didn't set the record straight.  He didn't advocate for himself.  He simply changed the subject.  It was amazing.
       I gained a great deal of respect that day for my Uncle Stephen.
       I appreciate all Stephen has done for our extended family.  He spent so many years serving us, gathering us, helping us, making sure we had what we needed at Hebgen, having fun with us, and loving us.
        I'm going to miss you, Stephen!  Give Mom a hug for me.
Love to all...
Louise Williams Nelson
_________________
My great uncle, Stephen covey has passed has away. What an amazing legacy he left. He was an awesome man, who loved us all unconditionaly. He will be missed. My thoughts and prayers are with my cousins and Aunt Sandra. Love You

-Melissa Hofmann Nichols
_________________ 

Stephen touched the lives of those close to him as well as those around the world through his love and words of wisdom. He was one of the most generous men I have known and he made everyone feel important. I am happy for the reunion he is having with my dear Nana and other loved ones who have passed on before him.

-Heidi Irene Nelson Cutler
_________________

Uncle Stephen R. Covey, we love you and will miss you. Thanks for the memories at Hebgen Lake, your books, your hard work, your passion, and the legacy you've left behind!

♥ -Meg Williams Miles
_________________

My Great Uncle Stephen R. Covey passed away early this morning. We'll miss you Stephen! Thanks for all the fun times at your house, making s'mores at Legacy, and singing at the top of our lungs on the beach at Hebgen! Thanks for all the lives you touched and will forever touch. 

-Joseph David Nelson
_________________
I didnt know him well, but my great uncle passed away today, and he did alot of good for alot of people!!

-Whitney Diane Jackson Johnson
_________________
Dear Cousins,
I am sad and have been thinking how Stephen's life has impacted mine. He was my hero, a mentor, a guiding light that I constantly refer to in my mind. His essence and love is in my heart. I am so sorry of his passing and for his family. His memory is cherished and life sustaining. Love to you
all!

-Chris and Wendy 
 _________________
Dear Cousins,
Like Chris, my life has also been greatly influenced by Stephen.  Perhaps the most inspiring thing to me is how he has looked out for so many, in spite of the enormous commitments that he was dealing with.  Over all those years, he could have been self consumed with his own work and success, and yet he was interested in and cared for each one of us.  What a great legacy he has left to us all. 
When I first learned of his illness, tears well up in my eyes, as I thought about the loss of this wonderful generous friend to us all. 
Denise and I send our love to Sandra and all of the Covey families.

Love, Clayt



 







Obituary
Published in Salt Lake Tribune from July 19 to July 21, 2012 

Stephen Richards Covey

 "Papa"
1932 ~ 2012
Our beloved husband, father, and grandfather, Stephen R. Covey, passed away peacefully at a hospital in Idaho Falls, Idaho, early on the morning of July 16, 2012, due to the residual effects of a bicycle accident he sustained this past April. He was in his 80th year. In his final hours, he was surrounded by his loving wife and each of his nine children and their spouses, which was a tender mercy of the Lord and something he always desired.
Stephen was born and raised in Salt Lake City, Utah, to Stephen Glenn and Irene Louise Richards Covey. He attended East High School and graduated from the University of Utah with a degree in business. Following his graduation, Stephen served a mission to the British Isles. Upon his return, he earned an MBA from Harvard Business School and then began his teaching career at Brigham Young University where he later earned his doctorate degree.
Stephen was a faithful member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and served in various capacities, including as a bishop, regional representative, temple sealer, and an advisor to the LDS Church Missionary Committee. At the age of 29, Stephen was called as the first mission president to Ireland, a calling he loved and which became a formative experience in his life.
It was while serving as a missionary in England that he discovered his talent and passion for teaching. In 1983, he made the decision to leave his full time teaching position at BYU, which he had thoroughly enjoyed for over 25 years, to start an organization, Covey Leadership Center (which later became FranklinCovey), with the mission of taking Principle-Centered Leadership to the world. This mission influenced him to grow a global organization with operations in over 125 countries and to personally deliver thousands of speeches to individuals, leaders, CEO's, Generals, and Heads of State from all around the globe and to write dozens of books which have sold millions of copies in numerous languages. He thereby influenced literally tens of millions of people and thousands of organizations and communities everywhere. He was always surprised and embarrassed by his professional success and simply saw himself as a steward of the great work he was doing, always giving credit to God.
Dad's greatest joy was his family. He'd prefer to spend time with his wife, kids, and grandkids than with anyone else. He loved family trips, special one-on-one dates, birthdays, farewells and homecomings, kids' sporting events, skiing at Sundance, and late night talks. He loved spending time in Montana on the lake where he taught us to water-ski, drive boats, ride bikes, fish, and shoot the bow and arrow and BB guns. He loved gathering his family and holding family councils and firesides where he would teach us important lessons such as how to make Christ the center of our lives or how to better serve Mom so that we "don't kill her off."
Dad simply adored Mom, the former Sandra Merrill, and the love of his life, whom he met while he was a missionary and she was traveling abroad as the youngest member of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They later married on August 14, 1956, in the Salt Lake Temple, a marriage which led to nine children, 52 grandchildren, and six great-grandchildren.
Dad loved the Savior and believed that if you put Him at the center of your life, everything else would fall into place. He was humble, compassionate, and generous to a fault. He had unbelievable optimism, was so affirming, and saw the good in everyone.
He frequently played practical jokes on his friends, and let the kids build peanut butter and jelly sandwiches on his bald head more than once. He had a multitude of friends from all walks of life. He enjoyed riding his bike, watching inspiring movies, eating Chinese food and cherry-chocolate malts, attending BYU sporting events, and asking his wife to sing in public without any warning whatsoever.
Throughout his life, on most mornings, he would arise early, go to a place where he could be alone, and he would pray, meditate, and study the scriptures. This daily private victory, as he coined it, became the source of his security, guidance, wisdom, and power and he often told us kids that "if you will spend twenty minutes each day with the Savior of the world in private worship, you will spend eternity in his presence."
We are grateful for our knowledge of the Plan of Salvation and know that our patriarch has been taken home to a loving Heavenly Father and is now with his sweet mother and father, his sister Marilyn, and many other relatives and friends. We will sorely miss our "Papa" and long for the day when we will once again be united.
Stephen is survived by his wife of nearly 56 years, Sandra Merrill; his nine children and their spouses: Cynthia (Kameron) Haller, Maria (David) Cole, Stephen M.R. (Jerolyn) Covey, Sean (Rebecca) Covey, David (Pamelyn) Covey, Catherine (Paul) Sagers, Colleen (Matthew) Brown, Jenny (Jason) Pitt, Joshua (Jenny) Covey; his siblings: Irene (Cal) Gaddis, Helen Jean Williams, and his best friend and brother John (Jane) Covey.
Funeral services will be held at 1:00 p.m., Saturday, July 21, 2012 at the UCCU Events Center at Utah Valley University, 800 W. University Parkway, Orem, Utah (just off of the University Parkway freeway exit). Friends may call from 5:00-8:00 p.m., Friday, July 20 at the Oak Hills Stake Center, 925 East North Temple Drive, Provo, Utah (across from the Provo LDS Temple) and at the UCCU Events Center, Saturday, from 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. prior to services. Condolences may be entered on his obituary at www.bergmortuary.com.
If desired, donations may be made to the I Am A Leader Foundation, a charity supported by Stephen and dedicated to developing character and leadership skills in children and youth in public schools. Please visit any Zions Bank location for assistance or send your donation to: I Am A Leader Foundation, PO Box 1936, Provo, UT 84603, USA.

Clarissa Lyman (1790-1854)

Birthdate:    June 6, 1790
Birthplace:    Lebanon, NH, USA
Death:     Died February 14, 1854 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, UT


CLARISSA LYMAN SMITH
HISTORY BY: LaRue Pitts
BIRTH DATE: 27 Jun 1790 Lebanon, New Hampshire
DEATH: 14 Feb 1854 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., UT.
PARENTS: Richard Lyman and Philomela Loomis LYMAN (father
served with General Putman in Revolutionary War. He was
a sergeant.
PIONEER: 24 Sept 1847 in Daniel Spencer company John SMITH
SPOUSE: John SMITH born July 16, 1781. He was Patriarch of the
church after the Saints arrived in Salt Lake.
MARRIED: 11 Sept 1815
DEATH: 23 May 1884
CHILDREN:
Infant daughter. Born May 9 1819, died May 10 18??. Born and died in
Potsdam, N.Y.
George A. 26 Jun 1817??
Caroline (Callister) 6 Jun 1820
John Lyman 17 Nov 1828?? All children born in Potsdam, NY.
Clarissa LYMAN was born to Richard and Philomela Loomis LYMAN in 1790
in Lebanon, Grafton Co., New Hampshire. Her father was a hero of the
Revolutionary War. He died relatively young in 1802 when Clarissa was but 12
years old. She had 8 brothers and sisters. She was sent to live with her uncle,
Elijah Lyman, in Vermont who reared her.
She married John SMITH, the son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty Smith on 11
Sept 1815. They had four children, their first died the day she was born. Clarissa
8
and John settled in the St. Lawrence Co., New York, where their children were
born and where they first heard from John's brother, Joseph Smith, Sr., of the
coming forth of the Book of Mormon. Clarissa, endowed with great faith and
spirituality, followed her convictions with courage and became the first of the
Smith Family baptized, Her husband followed her into baptism four months later.
Because of their ardent testimonies of the Gospel truthfulness, they soon sold
their holding and moved to Kirtland, Ohio, then to Missouri with all its heartaches
and devastation, and then to Nauvoo. She cared for her family while her husband
filled several missions, and she repeatedly experienced the loss of what few
possessions they had due to the mobbings and persecutions she endured. She
still continued to remain faithful, patient and generous, when again mobbed from
their comfortable homes in Nauvoo. Clarissa and John made their way west
among the earliest settlers, and arrived on September 24, 1847 with the Daniel
Spencer Wagon Company. John was called stake president and Clarissa served
alongside as his wife and companion. Soon after their arrival, they again had a
comfortable home in the new land.
A deep love existed between Clarissa and her husband, John. At her passing,
he was so restless and lonely without her that he, too, soon passed away within
three months. At the time of her death, the Deseret News paid her this tribute:
"She was a firm believer in the influence of the everlasting Gospel. She
possessed a heart full of benevolence and kindness to all; she bore her long and
severe illness without murmur or complaint."
Clarissa Lyman Smith passed away on February 14, 1854 in Salt Lake City,
Utah. John followed her on May 23, 1854. Her three children survived them.
George A. served as an Apostle of the Lord Jesus Christ until his death in 1875.
Clarissa and John Smith were truly devoted, strong, committed members of the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and lived their lives according to its
principles. They were true pioneers of faith and fortitude to be honored by all.
9
FROM: Pioneer Women of Faith and Fortitude 209
Little Clarissa Lyman was born to the family of Richard and Philomela Loomis
Lyman in Lebanon, Grafton County, New Hampshire, on 27 June, 1790. Her
father was a hero of the Revolutionary War, having served with great distinction
under General Putnam; he died relatively young in 1802 when Clarissa was but
twelve. She had eight brothers and sisters. As a result of his passing she was
sent to live with her uncle, Elijah Lyman, in Brookfield, Vermont, who reared her.
She was married to John Smith, the son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty Smith,
the 11th of September of 1815, and to their union were born four children: an
infant daughter who died the day of her birth, a son George A. Smith, 26 June
1817 (later an apostle); a daughter Caroline Smith (-), born 6 June, 1820, and
another son John Lyman Smith, born 17 November, 1828.
Clarissa and John settled in Potsdam, St. Lawrence County, New York,
where their children were born and where they first heard from John's brother
Joseph Smith, Sr. of the coming forth of the Book of Mormon. Clarissa, endowed
with great faith and spirituality, followed her strong convictions with courage and
became the first of the Smith Family to be baptized. It happened that her mother,
Philomela Loomis Lyman, was visiting with her at the time. Her husband John
Smith followed her into the waters of baptism four months later.
Because of their ardent testimonies of the truthfulness of the gospel they
soon sold their holdings in Potsdam and removed to Kirtland, Ohio, to gather with
the Saints. Clarissa made homes in the places the Saints were called upon to
move to, from Ohio to Missouri with all its attendant heartaches and devastation,
and then on to Nauvoo. She took care of her family and provided for them while
10
her husband filled several missions; she experienced repeatedly losing what few
possessions they had due to mobbings and persecution, and she endured
traveling long distances with scant comforts, but she continued faithful and
patient and generous.
When the Saints were once again mobbed from their comfortable homes in
Nauvoo Clarissa and John made their way west to the Salt Lake Valley among its
earliest settlers, arriving on the 24th of September, 1847 with the Daniel Spencer
company. Within a month of their arrival John was called upon to serve as the
stake president in the Salt Lake Valley, which meant, of course, that Clarissa
served alongside as his wife and companion. Upon their arrival to the valley they
discovered that the cabin that their son George A. was to build for them had not
had the roof yet put in place, but that was soon attended to, and again she made
a comfortable home in the new land to which they had been called.
A deep love existed between Clarissa and her husband John. At her passing
he was so restless and lonely without her that he, too, soon passed within three
months. At the time of her death the Deseret News paid her this tribute: "She
was a firm believer in the influence of the everlasting Gospel. She possessed a
heart full of benevolence and kindness to all; she bore her long and severe
illness without murmur or complaint." She died 14 February, 1854 in Salt Lake
City, Utah. John followed her in May on the 23rd, 1854. Her three children
survived her, one serving as an apostle of the Lord Jesus Christ until his death in
1875.
Entered Valley 24 September 1847 in Daniel Spencer's Company. (J. H.
1847, p.8.) She was born 27 June 1790 at Lebanon, Grafton Co., New
Hampshire, daughter of Richard Lyman and Philomela Loomis. Her father,
Richard Lyman, served with General Putman in the Revolutionary War with the
rank of and orderly sergeant. General Putman said: "If I had a thousand men like
Orderly Lyman I would drive the Red-coats out of America in six months." She
11
was baptized in September 1831; migrated to Kirtland, Ohio, from St. Lawrence
County, New York, in May 1833; suffered the trials of persecution and sickness
with the Saints; known for benevolence and kindness to all. She died 14
February 1854, in Salt Lake City at age of 63 years, 7 months, 18 days.



Clarence Merrill (1841-1918) 76 YRS

Bathsheba Kate Smith (1844-1920) 76 YRS

Sons and daughters of George A. Smith. In front, sitting, Pearl Smith. Left to right seated: Clarissa Smith Williams, Bathsheba Smith Merrill, John Henry Smith, Sarah Maria Smith Colton, Mary Amelia Smith Wimmer; standing, Elizabeth Smith Cartwright, Margaret Smith Parry, Chalres Warren Smith, Grace Libby Smith Cheever, and Priscilla Smith Taylor



Irene Louise Richards (1902-1991) 89 YRS

FAST FACTS

NOTES

  • Went by her middle name, Louise
  • Traveled the world with her husband, Stephen Glenn Covey
  • Gathered family often
  • Loved to play bridge--and she was good at it
  • Avid reader

BIRTH...5 April 1902, SLC, UT 

PARENTS...Stephen L and Irene Smith Merrill Richards

BAPTISM...
MARRIAGE...02 February 1922 (2-2-22)

CHILDREN
  1. Irene Louise Covey
  2. Helen Jean Covey
  3. Marilyn Richards Covey
  4. Stephen Richards Covey
  5. John Mack Richards Covey
DEATH...28 May 1991

DIRECT LINE
  1. Irene Louise Richards
  2. Marilyn Richards Covey
_____________________


Irene Louise Richards as a baby,
Special Collections Dept, J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah
Special Collections Dept, J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah

Special Collections Dept, J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah
Stephen Longstroth and Emma Stayner Richards family. Stephen L (back row on the right end, Irene Smith Merrill Richards, 4th from the right, back row. Irene Louise Richards--2nd from left, back row, with doll. Special Collections Dept, J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah
Grandy (Irene Louise Richards) & her grandfather, Stephen Longstroth Richards in the dining room of the canyon cabin
Collections Dept, J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah

Add caption
Cabin on the Snake River
Special Collections Dept, J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah

75th birthday reception for Emma Louise Stayner Richards given by Irene and Steve Richards.  l to r, Irene Louise Richards, Grace Richards Warner, Emma Louise Stayner Richards, Irene Smith Merrill RichardsSpecial Collections Dept, J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah
At Grandy and Papa"s house:  front row, l to r, Cynthia, Clayt, Cathy, Louise, Steve, Dan.  2nd row, l to r, Jeannie, Ned, Dave, Helen Jean, Grandy, Papa, Irene, Cal, Jenny.  3rd row, l to r, Jeff, Carol, John, Johnny, Jane, baby, Clayt Marilyn, Sandra, Maria, Stephen, Ann, Chris

OBITUARY

LOUISE RICHARDS COVEY 

Deseret News
Published: Thursday, May 30 1991 12:00 a.m. MDT
 

Summary
Beloved mother, grandmother, great grandmother, sister, friend, Irene Louise Richards Covey, age 89, died Tuesday, May 28,1991 after a short illness.
She was born April 5, 1902 in Salt Lake City, Utah, the first daughter of Irene Smith Merrill and Stephen L Richards. She married Stephen Glenn Covey February 2, 1922 in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. He died February 16, 1980.
 

Beloved mother, grandmother, great grandmother, sister, friend, Irene Louise Richards Covey, age 89, died Tuesday, May 28,1991 after a short illness.  

She was born April 5, 1902 in Salt Lake City, Utah, the first daughter of Irene Smith Merrill and Stephen L Richards. She married Stephen Glenn Covey February 2, 1922 in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. He died February 16, 1980.  

She was a devoted member of the LDS Church, serving in callings such as the Relief Society presidency of her ward and on the Stake Board. She graduated from LDS High School, attended the University of Utah and BYU. Typical of her diverse talents, she taught English, speech, dancing, and gym at the Fielding Academy in Paris, Idaho--all this at age 18. There she produced, cast, and directed several plays, even applying the makeup. She took these productions to neighboring towns, traveling by horse-drawn wagon or sleigh. She also taught in Gunnison High School.   

She was an insatiable student, taking classes at the University of Utah most of her life. An avid reader, she kept abreast of literature, current events as she broadened rather than narrowed her outlook as she grew older. To the end, she never lost her humor or refinement. 

She was co-founder of the Fine Arts Club, member of Friendship Circle, Cleofan, Classics Club, D.U.P., and enjoyed warm friendships. Active in the Women's Legislative Council for years, she also participated in numerous community activities. Traditionalist, enamored of her forebears, she loved most, both her family and extended family, never missing anything, from a birthday to a performance to a graduation. Vibrant, sociable, the heart of every occasion, she thrived on bringing people together, and she loved each one, as much as they loved her.  

She and Steve "Grandy" and "Papa" had a rich life together. They traveled extensively in later years to most parts of the world. Louise kept copious journals, and coupled with Steve's movies, she relived these journeys many times with her family. They were members of Ft. Douglas Club, Bonneville Knife and Fork Club, and Church History Group. 

She is survived by Irene Covey Gaddis and Cal; Helen-Jean C. Williams; Marilyn R. C. Williams; Stephen R. Covey and Sandra; John M. R. Covey and Jane; and 32 grandchildren; 66 great-grandchildren; brothers and sisters: Lynn S. Richards, Philip L. Richards, and Lois R. Hinckley, all of Salt Lake City; Richard M. Richards, Provo, and Alice R. Allen, Palo Alto. 

She was preceded in death by parents, sisters, Georgia R. Olsen, Helen Richards, and brother, Joseph Richards. 

Funeral services will be held Saturday, 12:00 Noon, June 1,1991 at the Monument Park 17th Ward, 2795 East Crestview Drive (1020 So.). Friends may call at Wasatch Lawn Mortuary, 3401 S. Highland Drive, Friday 6-9 p.m. and Saturday at the ward from 10:30 to 11:45 a.m. prior to services. Interment, Wasatch Lawn Memorial Park.



Emma Turner (1833-1875)

Emma Turner with 2 yr old Emma Louise Stayner
FAST FACTS

NOTES

BIRTH...21 November 1833, Malvern, Worcester, England

PARENTS...Henry Turner and Ann Steed

BAPTISM...

MARRIAGE...27 March 1857

CHILDREN
  1. Emma Louise
  2. Arthur
  3. Herbert
  4. Horace
  5. Marian (May)
  6. Gertrude
  7. David Henry
  8. George Colley
  9. Katherine Elizabeth
  10. Myrtle Agnes

DEATH...5 April 1875

DIRECT LINE
  1. Emma Turner
  2. Emma Louise Stayner
  3. Stephen L Richards
  4. Irene Louise Richards
  5. Marilyn Richards Covey 
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Susannah Ogden (1785-1847)

Mark & Susannah Ogden Bigler, I'm not positive this photo is legit, but if it is, it's cool
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Born 11 Oct 1785 Port Tabacco, Charles, Maryland
 
Life note:  Her family was wealthy.  They were also ahead of their times - they freed their slaves
 
Parents Jonathan Ogden and Nancy Ann Howell
 
Died 14 Mar 1847 Winter Quarters, Omaha, Nebraska
 
Buried Mormon Cemetery, Winter Quarters, Nebraska
 
Sources
Pic: http://www.findagrave.com/
http://www.winterquarters.byu.edu/

Mark Bigler 1785-1839

Mark & Susannah Ogden Bigler, I'm not positive this photo is legit, but if it is, it's cool





Someone named Jen stumbled on The Dearies and commented on this photo.  It actually is Mark Bigler's daughter and her husband.  Rats.  Has anyone ever seen a photograph or daguerreotype of Mark and Susannah Ogden Bigler?  (I've been searching).

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Born 19 May 1785 

Shinnston, Harrison, West Virginia
 
Parents Jacob Bigler and Hannah Booher (lots of variations on her surname)
 
Life Notes:  He was considered a 'southern' gentleman.  He owned a 300 acre plantation.  When Mormon missionaires visited, the entire family decided to be baptized.  One of the missionaries was George Albert Smith, his future son-in-law, who married his youngest daughter, Bathsheba two weeks after George returned from a second mission (England). 
 
Married Susannah Ogden 4 Nov 1805 Harrison County, West Virginia
 
Note:  her name is spelled Susanna in the record
 
Died 23 Sep 1839 Quincy, Adams, Illinois
 
Buried Madison Park Cemetery, Quincy, Adams, Illinois Lot 28 2nd Row

James Hope Covey (1686-1728)

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James Hope Covey (b. Bet. 1686 - 1687, d. 21 Mar 1728)

James Hope Covey (son of Hope Covey and Mary Lanphere) was born Bet. 1686 - 1687 in Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island, and died 21 Mar 1728 in Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island. He married Sarah Lamphere on 21 Mar 1707 in Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island, daughter of George Lamphere and Jane Ann Hulet.

 Notes for James Hope Covey:
Birth: 1 MAR 1687 in Westerly, Rhode Island
Rachel and her brother James Jr. married siblings

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY COLONIAL ANCESTORS
PG.62
Covey, James (1687- ) RI. m. Mary Lanphere, MilitaryService.
1761 son Samuel says he was born in Montgomery Co.,Va.
1769, son Hope born in Frederickstown, Ny
1775, son Kingsbury born Cayuga Co., Ny


More About James Hope Covey and Sarah Lamphere:
Marriage: 21 Mar 1707, Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island.

Children of James Hope Covey and Sarah Lamphere are:
Sarah Covey, b. 11 Jan 1708, d. date unknown.
Mary Covey, b. 03 Sep 1709, Westerly, Washington, Ri, d. date unknown.
+Hope Covey, b. 15 Sep 1712, Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island, d. 16 Jul 1787, Burlington, Hartford County, Connecticut.
+James Jr. Covey, b. 24 Jun 1715, Westerly, Rhode Island, d. 1782, Washington, Virginia.
John Covey, b. 16 Mar 1716, or 1717 Westerly, Washington, RI, d. date unknown.
Joseph Covey, b. 16 May 1719, Westerly, Washington, Ri, d. date unknown.
Samuel Covey, b. 23 Dec 1723, Westerly, Washington, Ri, d. 1782.
Elisha Covey, b. 07 Mar 1723, or 1724 Westerly, Washington, Ri, d. 07 Dec 1730, Westerly, Washington, Ri.
Stephen Covey, b. 05 Feb 1725, or 1726 Westerly, Washington, Ri, d. date unknown.

Sarah Hatch

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Walter Covey (1750-1834) 84 yrs

FAST FACTS

NOTES

BIRTH...1750, Frederickstown Precinct, Dutchess County, New York

PARENTS...James Covey, Jr. and Mary Lamphere

BAPTISM...

MARRIAGE...Sarah Hatch about 1773

CHILDREN

  1. James H Covey
  2. Walter Covey, b. 14 Jul 1775, Ny, New York, d. 14 Aug 1847, Venice, Cayuga, New York.
  3. Edward Covey, b. 25 Dec 1782, New York, d. 28 Nov 1854, Farmer City, Dewitt, Ill.
  4. Jonathon Covey, b. 1784, De Witt Co., De Witt, Illinois, d. date unknown.
  5. +Sarah Covey, b. Abt. 1787, Fredricks, Dutchess, New York, d. date unknown.
  6. Mary Covey, b. 1788, Ny, Ny, d. date unknown.
  7. William Covey, b. 1790, Ny, Ny, d. date unknown.
  8. Benjamin Covey, b. 09 Mar 1792, Fredericktown, Dutchess, New York, d. 13 Mar 1868, Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah.
  9. Elisha Covey, d. date unknown.DEATH...

DIRECT LINE

  1. Walter Covey
  2. Benjamin Covey
  3. Enoch Covey
  4. Stephen Mack Covey
  5. Stephen Glenn Covey
  6. Marilyn Richards Covey
________________________________________________Walter Covey (son of James Jr. Covey and Mary Lamphere) was born 1750 in Frederickstown Precinct, Dutchess County, New York, and died 17 Jan 1834 in Venice, Coyga, New York. He married (1) Sarah Hatch on Abt. 1773. He married (2) Mehitable on Aft. 1816.

 Notes for Walter Covey:
b: 1750 in Frederickstown Precinct, Dutchess County, New York

More About Walter Covey and Sarah Hatch:
Marriage: Abt. 1773

More About Walter Covey and Mehitable:
Marriage: Aft. 1816

Children of Walter Covey and Sarah Hatch are:
James H Covey, b. Abt. 1773, d. date unknown.
Walter Covey, b. 14 Jul 1775, Ny, New York, d. 14 Aug 1847, Venice, Cayuga, New York.
Edward Covey, b. 25 Dec 1782, New York, d. 28 Nov 1854, Farmer City, Dewitt, Ill.
Jonathon Covey, b. 1784, De Witt Co., De Witt, Illinois, d. date unknown.
+Sarah Covey, b. Abt. 1787, Fredricks, Dutchess, New York, d. date unknown.
Mary Covey, b. 1788, Ny, Ny, d. date unknown.
William Covey, b. 1790, Ny, Ny, d. date unknown.
Benjamin Covey, b. 09 Mar 1792, Fredericktown, Dutchess, New York, d. 13 Mar 1868, Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah.
Elisha Covey, d. date unknown.