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Stephen Mack & Hannah Saunders Covey family

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Irene, Stephen, Grandy, Helen Jean, John, Marilyn

Slide 3

Grandy, Marilyn, Helen Jean, Irene

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Papa & Grandy

Slide 5

Stephen Mack Covey, 4th from the right

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John, Helen Jean, Irene, Stephen

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Stephen L with his boys

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Family photo at Grandy & Papa's house

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Snake River cabin

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Stephen Longstroth Richards and Grandy in the dining room at the canyon cabin

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Christmas, approximately 1912

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Believed to be Mark & Susannah Ogden Bigler

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George Albert & Bathsheba Bigler Smith

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L to R, Stephen Glenn Covey, Irene Louise Richards Covey, Stephen Mack Covey

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Enoch & Janett Carruth Young Covey

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Stephen L & Irene Smith Merrill Richards

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Demas Ashdown & Hannah Barwell Saunders

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Stephen Glenn Covey (2nd from right, back row) with siblings

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Covey Family Photo at Grandy's and Papa's

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L to R, John, Marilyn, Helen Jean, Irene, Stephen

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Stephen Mack & Hannah Ashdown Covey

Example Frame

Clarissa Lyman (1790-1854)

Birthdate:    June 6, 1790
Birthplace:    Lebanon, NH, USA
Death:     Died February 14, 1854 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, UT


CLARISSA LYMAN SMITH
HISTORY BY: LaRue Pitts
BIRTH DATE: 27 Jun 1790 Lebanon, New Hampshire
DEATH: 14 Feb 1854 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., UT.
PARENTS: Richard Lyman and Philomela Loomis LYMAN (father
served with General Putman in Revolutionary War. He was
a sergeant.
PIONEER: 24 Sept 1847 in Daniel Spencer company John SMITH
SPOUSE: John SMITH born July 16, 1781. He was Patriarch of the
church after the Saints arrived in Salt Lake.
MARRIED: 11 Sept 1815
DEATH: 23 May 1884
CHILDREN:
Infant daughter. Born May 9 1819, died May 10 18??. Born and died in
Potsdam, N.Y.
George A. 26 Jun 1817??
Caroline (Callister) 6 Jun 1820
John Lyman 17 Nov 1828?? All children born in Potsdam, NY.
Clarissa LYMAN was born to Richard and Philomela Loomis LYMAN in 1790
in Lebanon, Grafton Co., New Hampshire. Her father was a hero of the
Revolutionary War. He died relatively young in 1802 when Clarissa was but 12
years old. She had 8 brothers and sisters. She was sent to live with her uncle,
Elijah Lyman, in Vermont who reared her.
She married John SMITH, the son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty Smith on 11
Sept 1815. They had four children, their first died the day she was born. Clarissa
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and John settled in the St. Lawrence Co., New York, where their children were
born and where they first heard from John's brother, Joseph Smith, Sr., of the
coming forth of the Book of Mormon. Clarissa, endowed with great faith and
spirituality, followed her convictions with courage and became the first of the
Smith Family baptized, Her husband followed her into baptism four months later.
Because of their ardent testimonies of the Gospel truthfulness, they soon sold
their holding and moved to Kirtland, Ohio, then to Missouri with all its heartaches
and devastation, and then to Nauvoo. She cared for her family while her husband
filled several missions, and she repeatedly experienced the loss of what few
possessions they had due to the mobbings and persecutions she endured. She
still continued to remain faithful, patient and generous, when again mobbed from
their comfortable homes in Nauvoo. Clarissa and John made their way west
among the earliest settlers, and arrived on September 24, 1847 with the Daniel
Spencer Wagon Company. John was called stake president and Clarissa served
alongside as his wife and companion. Soon after their arrival, they again had a
comfortable home in the new land.
A deep love existed between Clarissa and her husband, John. At her passing,
he was so restless and lonely without her that he, too, soon passed away within
three months. At the time of her death, the Deseret News paid her this tribute:
"She was a firm believer in the influence of the everlasting Gospel. She
possessed a heart full of benevolence and kindness to all; she bore her long and
severe illness without murmur or complaint."
Clarissa Lyman Smith passed away on February 14, 1854 in Salt Lake City,
Utah. John followed her on May 23, 1854. Her three children survived them.
George A. served as an Apostle of the Lord Jesus Christ until his death in 1875.
Clarissa and John Smith were truly devoted, strong, committed members of the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and lived their lives according to its
principles. They were true pioneers of faith and fortitude to be honored by all.
9
FROM: Pioneer Women of Faith and Fortitude 209
Little Clarissa Lyman was born to the family of Richard and Philomela Loomis
Lyman in Lebanon, Grafton County, New Hampshire, on 27 June, 1790. Her
father was a hero of the Revolutionary War, having served with great distinction
under General Putnam; he died relatively young in 1802 when Clarissa was but
twelve. She had eight brothers and sisters. As a result of his passing she was
sent to live with her uncle, Elijah Lyman, in Brookfield, Vermont, who reared her.
She was married to John Smith, the son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty Smith,
the 11th of September of 1815, and to their union were born four children: an
infant daughter who died the day of her birth, a son George A. Smith, 26 June
1817 (later an apostle); a daughter Caroline Smith (-), born 6 June, 1820, and
another son John Lyman Smith, born 17 November, 1828.
Clarissa and John settled in Potsdam, St. Lawrence County, New York,
where their children were born and where they first heard from John's brother
Joseph Smith, Sr. of the coming forth of the Book of Mormon. Clarissa, endowed
with great faith and spirituality, followed her strong convictions with courage and
became the first of the Smith Family to be baptized. It happened that her mother,
Philomela Loomis Lyman, was visiting with her at the time. Her husband John
Smith followed her into the waters of baptism four months later.
Because of their ardent testimonies of the truthfulness of the gospel they
soon sold their holdings in Potsdam and removed to Kirtland, Ohio, to gather with
the Saints. Clarissa made homes in the places the Saints were called upon to
move to, from Ohio to Missouri with all its attendant heartaches and devastation,
and then on to Nauvoo. She took care of her family and provided for them while
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her husband filled several missions; she experienced repeatedly losing what few
possessions they had due to mobbings and persecution, and she endured
traveling long distances with scant comforts, but she continued faithful and
patient and generous.
When the Saints were once again mobbed from their comfortable homes in
Nauvoo Clarissa and John made their way west to the Salt Lake Valley among its
earliest settlers, arriving on the 24th of September, 1847 with the Daniel Spencer
company. Within a month of their arrival John was called upon to serve as the
stake president in the Salt Lake Valley, which meant, of course, that Clarissa
served alongside as his wife and companion. Upon their arrival to the valley they
discovered that the cabin that their son George A. was to build for them had not
had the roof yet put in place, but that was soon attended to, and again she made
a comfortable home in the new land to which they had been called.
A deep love existed between Clarissa and her husband John. At her passing
he was so restless and lonely without her that he, too, soon passed within three
months. At the time of her death the Deseret News paid her this tribute: "She
was a firm believer in the influence of the everlasting Gospel. She possessed a
heart full of benevolence and kindness to all; she bore her long and severe
illness without murmur or complaint." She died 14 February, 1854 in Salt Lake
City, Utah. John followed her in May on the 23rd, 1854. Her three children
survived her, one serving as an apostle of the Lord Jesus Christ until his death in
1875.
Entered Valley 24 September 1847 in Daniel Spencer's Company. (J. H.
1847, p.8.) She was born 27 June 1790 at Lebanon, Grafton Co., New
Hampshire, daughter of Richard Lyman and Philomela Loomis. Her father,
Richard Lyman, served with General Putman in the Revolutionary War with the
rank of and orderly sergeant. General Putman said: "If I had a thousand men like
Orderly Lyman I would drive the Red-coats out of America in six months." She
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was baptized in September 1831; migrated to Kirtland, Ohio, from St. Lawrence
County, New York, in May 1833; suffered the trials of persecution and sickness
with the Saints; known for benevolence and kindness to all. She died 14
February 1854, in Salt Lake City at age of 63 years, 7 months, 18 days.